Akram Zaatari

Akram Zaatari: The End of Time


For his exhibition at The Power Plant, Lebanese artist Zaatari will explore questions of memory, time, sexuality and human intimacy.

CURATOR: VALERIE VELARDO


Lebanese artist Akram Zaatari examines how our individual experiences are deeply intertwined with specific cultural and political histories. Zaatari’s practice is rooted in collecting and recontextualizing a wide range of personal documents, including photographs, notes, audiotapes and other recordings, in order to create video and photo narratives. For his exhibition at The Power Plant, Zaatari will explore questions of memory, time, sexuality and human intimacy through his installation Time Capsule Simulation (2013) and his video The End of Time (2013).

Zaatari first produced Time Capsule Kassel as a site-specific installation for dOCUMENTA (13) in 2012. The work offers a possible preservation scenario for the Arab Image Foundation, a non-profit organization co-founded by Zaatari in 1997 and holds more than 600,000 photographs from the Middle East, North Africa and the Arab diaspora. Zaatari will couple Time Capsule with the video installation The End of Time; a work that poignantly examines the birth and the disappearance of desire, an endless chain with successive beginnings and endings enacted by three figures. Together, the works presented at The Power Plant highlight human connection to preservation: of life, love and desire.

Akram Zaatari (born Saida, Lebanon, 1966) lives and works in Beirut. He studied architecture at The American University of Beirut as well as media studies at The New School University, New York. In 2011, he was awarded the Grand Prize of the SESC Videobrasil Festival, São Paulo. His work has been presented internationally in solo exhibitions and festivals including the 55th Venice Biennial (2013), Museum of Modern Art, New York (2013), Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (2012), Galerie Sfeir-Semler, Hamburg (2012), MUAC, Mexico City (2012), Liverpool Biennial (2012), and Kunstnernes Hus, Oslo (2011). His work is in numerous public collections including Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, Tate Modern, London, Museum of Modern Art, New York, Arco Foundation, Madrid, and Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris.

Zaatari is represented by Sfeir-Semler Gallery in Beirut / Hamburg; Kurimanzutto, Mexico and Thomas Dane Gallery, London.