The Power Plant

Arctic/Amazon: Networks of Global Indigeneity

Sonya Kelliher-Combs, Tanya Lukin Linklater, Couzyn van Heuvelen, Máret Ánne Sara, Uýra, Olinda Reshijabe Silvano, Morzaniel Iramari, Leandro Lima & Gisela Motta, Sheroanawe Hakihiiwe, and Outi Pieski

Ongoing Exhibition

Oct 01 – Dec 30 2022

Uýra, Untitled (Série elementar: Lama), 2017. Photograph printed on fine art paper, 100 x 150 cm. Courtesy the artist.

Uýra, Untitled (Série elementar: Lama), 2017. Courtesy the artist.


LEAD DONOR

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MAJOR DONOR

Goring Family Foundation

INTERNATIONAL ARTS PARTNERS

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Outset

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Lead Curator

Gerald McMaster

Co-Curator

Nina Vincent

Institutional Curator

Noor Alé

Arctic/Amazon: Networks of Global Indigeneity_ explores the ways in which Indigenous contemporary artists take on issues of climate change, globalized Indigeneity, and contact zones in and about the Arctic and the Amazon during a time of crisis. The featured artists have their origins in these places, and their works embody a politics of resistance, resurgence, and ways of knowing and being in relation to the lands that are the source of their knowledge and creativity.

A constellation of new and past works by artists Sonya Kelliher-Combs (United States), Tanya Lukin Linklater (United States/Canada), Couzyn van Heuvelen (Canada), Máret Ánne Sara (Norway), Uýra (Indigenous in diaspora), Olinda Reshijabe Silvano (Peru), Morzaniel Iramari (Brazil), Leandro Lima & Gisela Motta (Brazil), Sheroanawe Hakihiiwe (Venezuela), and Outi Pieski (Finland) will be featured in Arctic/Amazon. Encompassing a range of media, including paintings, drawings, sculpture, installation, video, and performance, this exhibition seeks to shed light on current geopolitical and environmental sustainability issues that inform artistic practices in these two vastly different, yet interconnected, regions.

The main themes in this group exhibition are drawn from the Arctic/Amazon symposium that was co-hosted by the Ontario College of Art & Design University and The Power Plant in September 2019. The purpose of the symposium was to gather established and emerging Indigenous scholars, curators, and artists primarily from North American regions of the Arctic and Amazonian zones to meet, exchange ideas, share works, and develop collaborative strategies that would bring together traditional knowledges of Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities.

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Outi Pieski, Guržžot ja guovssat/Spell on you!, 2020. Thread, steel, wood. Installation view: Arctic/Amazon: Networks of Global Indigeneity, The Power Plant, Toronto, 2022. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

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Arctic/Amazon: Networks of Global Indigeneity, with works by Couzyn van Heuvelen. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

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Visitors in front of Leandro Lima and Gisela Motta, still from Xapiri, 2012. Video, 56:00. Installation view: Arctic/Amazon: Networks of Global Indigeneity, The Power Plant, Toronto, 2022. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

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Olinda Reshinjabe Silvano, Wilma Maynas, and Ronin Koshi, Kené paintings, 2022. Acrylic on canvas. Commissioned by The Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, 2022. Installation view: Arctic/Amazon: Networks of Global Indigeneity, The Power Plant, Toronto, 2022. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

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Arctic/Amazon: Networks of Global Indigeneity, with works by Tanya Lukin Linklater. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

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Arctic/Amazon: Networks of Global Indigeneity, with works by Sonya Kelliher-Combs, Uýra, and Sheroanawe Hakihiiwe. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

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Máret Ánne Sara, Gielastuvvon (Snared), 2018. Suohpan (lassos), čoarvegiella (lasso rings), and hanging structure; video,1:03. Collection of Nordnorsk Kunstmuseum, Tromsø, Norway. Installation view: Arctic/Amazon: Networks of Global Indigeneity, The Power Plant, Toronto, 2022. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

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Sonya Kelliher-Combs, Idiot Strings - Credible, 2022. Printed fabric, wool, steel wire, nylon thread, glass beads. Courtesy the artist. Installation view: Arctic/Amazon: Networks of Global Indigeneity, The Power Plant, Toronto, 2022. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

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Sonya Kelliher-Combs, Shedding Skin, 2022. Steel needles, nylon thread. Courtesy the artist. Installation view: Arctic/Amazon: Networks of Global Indigeneity, The Power Plant, Toronto, 2022. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

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Couzyn van Heuvelen, Avataq, 2016. Screen-printed mylar, ribbon, aluminum, helium. Installation view: Arctic/Amazon: Networks of Global Indigeneity, The Power Plant, Toronto, 2022. Photo: Toni Hafkenscheid.

CURATORS ON ARCTIC/AMAZON: NETWORKS OF GLOBAL INDIGENEITY

READING ROOM

Our reading list helps expand on ideas and themes of The Power Plant's exhibitions. View the Arctic/Amazon lead curator, Gerald McMaster's special book selection HERE.

About the Artists


Biret Pieski


Cecilia Vicuña


Couzyn Van Heuvelen

Couzyn van Heuvelen is an Inuk sculptor and installation artist originally from Iqaluit, NU. Based in southern Ontario, van Heuvelen's artistic practice focuses on fusing Inuit art history and traditions with contemporary materials and technologies. Van Heuvelen's use of unconventional materials and fabrication processes, combined with elements of Inuit culture, mirrors his own process of exploring how traditional practices continue to influence his everyday life.

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Gáddjá Haarla Pieski


Máret Ánne Sara

Máret Ánne Sara (b.1983) is an artist and author. She is from a reindeer herding family in Kautokeino and currently works in her hometown. Máret Ánne is the initiator of Dáiddadállu Artist Collective. She has published two novels and was nominated for the Nordic Council’s Children’s and Young Literature Prize in 2014 for her debut book “Ilmmid gaskkas” (published in Norwegian in 2014 and in English in 2016).

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Olinda Reshinjabe Silvano

Olinda Reshinjabe Silvano is an Indigenous Shipibo-Konibo artist from Peru, utilizing traditional art of kené in her creative practice. Her art targets an urban audience but brings into the city the power given her by the plants that she herself received as a child.

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Outi Pieski

Outi Pieski is a Sámi visual artist, born in 1973 in Helsinki, Finland. Pieski's paintings, collages and installations employ traditional handicrafts such as the tassels of Sámi shawls to depict the light and landscapes of the far north. Working primarily with installation and painting, artist and activist Outi Pieski has gained recognition for her artwork examining the history and identity of the Sami people.

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Pia Arke

Pia Arke was a Danish Greenlandic visual and performance artist, writer and photographer. She is remembered for her self-portraits, landscape photographs of Greenland and for her paintings and writings which strive to present the complex ethnic and cultural relationships between Denmark and Greenland.

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Ronin Koshi


Sheroanawe Hakihiiwe

Sheroanawe Hakihiiwe is an Indigenous Yanomami artist from Sheroana, a small community of the Upper Orinoco River in the Venezuelan Amazon. Working primarily with drawing and handmade papers crafted from native fibers, he draws from his ancestral knowledge of the signs and symbols of Yanomami culture, and their application in basketry and body painting for ritual ceremonies.

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Sonya Kelliher-Combs

Sonya Kelliher-Combs is an Iñupiaq and Athabascan multidisciplinary artist based out of Anchorage, Alaska. Kelliher-Combs born in 1969 in Bethel, Alaska and was raised in the Northwest Alaska community of Nome. Through her mixed media painting and sculpture, Kelliher-Combs offers a chronicle of the ongoing struggle for self-definition and identity in the Alaskan context.

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Tanya Lukin Linklater

Tanya Lukin Linklater is an Indigenous artist-choreographer of Alutiiq descent, born in 1976 in Kodiak Island, Alaska. Linklater's performances, works for camera, installations, and writings centre Indigenous peoples’ lived experiences, (home)lands, and structures of sustenance. Her performances in relation to objects in exhibition, scores, and ancestral belongings generate what she has come to call felt structures. She investigates insistence in both concept and application.

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Uýra

Uýra Sodoma is an Indigenous Brazilian visual artist born in 1991. A graduate of Biology and Ecology, they are also part of art education in riverside communities. They reside in Manaus, an industrial territory in the middle of the Central Amazon, where they transform themself into Uýra, a manifestation in animal and plant flesh that moves to expose and cure colonial systemic diseases.

Emerson Munduruku as Uýra

Wilma Maynas